Browse Prior Art Database

Nozzle Attachment for Coating Guns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039019D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hofmann, U: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a novel nozzle attachment for coating guns which are used to deposit magnetic compounds on substrates for producing magnetic disks. This nozzle attachment has the advantage that the stem of the gun is constantly surrounded by the agitated coating medium, so that there is no dead volume within the gun or a clumping of the coating medium. In conventional guns used for spraying, nebulizing or coating, the exit nozzle is screwed to the front of the stem of the coating gun, which inevitably leads to a dead volume. In addition, particularly with heavily sedimenting liquid mixtures, there is an increased risk of clumping, since in the area of the dead volume, the coating medium is at a standstill.

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Nozzle Attachment for Coating Guns

This article describes a novel nozzle attachment for coating guns which are used to deposit magnetic compounds on substrates for producing magnetic disks. This nozzle attachment has the advantage that the stem of the gun is constantly surrounded by the agitated coating medium, so that there is no dead volume within the gun or a clumping of the coating medium. In conventional guns used for spraying, nebulizing or coating, the exit nozzle is screwed to the front of the stem of the coating gun, which inevitably leads to a dead volume. In addition, particularly with heavily sedimenting liquid mixtures, there is an increased risk of clumping, since in the area of the dead volume, the coating medium is at a standstill. Even in the smallest dead volumes with standing liquid, agglomerates occur, leading to missing bits, coating rims and similar defects on the magnetic disk. The sectional views of Figs. 1 to 3 show two typical embodiments of the described nozzle attachment. In the nozzle attachment of Fig. 1, the medium passes inlet opening 1 perpendicularly to the stem/nozzle axis, being led past stem tip

(Image Omitted)

3 through channel 2 such that the former is constantly surrounded by the medium. The tapering of the channel cross-section at the rounded stem tip 3 accelerates the mass flow, preventing the medium from sedimenting and thus from clumping. The cross-sections of inlet opening 1 and outlet opening 4 are preferably of the s...