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Position-Sensitive Cryogenic Bolometer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039039D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bregman, MF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A cryogenic bolometer for use as an X-ray detector has been described by Moseley, Mather, and McCammon (J. Appl. Phys. 56(5) p.1257, Sept. 1, 1984). This bolometer can be modified to provide position sensing, by incorporating multiple thermistors to determine the position of impact of an X-ray or charged particle. When a charged particle or high energy photon deposits energy in a material, the temperature of the material is raised. By using a material with a very low specific heat cooled to a low temperature (<1oK), it is possible to detect extremely small energy depositions with high precision. The use of low thermal mass implanted thermistors to measure the temperature rise allows considerable flexibility.

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Position-Sensitive Cryogenic Bolometer

A cryogenic bolometer for use as an X-ray detector has been described by Moseley, Mather, and McCammon (J. Appl. Phys. 56(5) p.1257, Sept. 1, 1984). This bolometer can be modified to provide position sensing, by incorporating multiple thermistors to determine the position of impact of an X-ray or charged particle. When a charged particle or high energy photon deposits energy in a material, the temperature of the material is raised. By using a material with a very low specific heat cooled to a low temperature (<1oK), it is possible to detect extremely small energy depositions with high precision. The use of low thermal mass implanted thermistors to measure the temperature rise allows considerable flexibility. To obtain position information, multiple thermistors are implanted in a thin membrane of low specific heat material to triangulate the position of impact of an X-ray or charged particle. The relative arrival time of the thermal pulse at the thermistors gives the position of the original energy deposition. Position resolution of better than 1 micron is achievable with standard nanosecond timing electronics. A suitable configuration of this device is shown in the figure. It consists of a thin silicon membrane 10 (< ~ 100 microns) supported by three legs 12 (weak thermal links), over a silicon wafer 14. Membrane 10 has three thermistors 16 implanted into it. These allow position sensing for energy depositions anywhere withi...