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Electrostatic Page Printer Using a Thermal Trans-Fix Station and a Thin-Wall Electrostatic Drum

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039095D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dodds, CI: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

We have demonstrated the feasibility of an electrostatic printer using a thin-wall aluminum image drum which is coated with a dialectic (Fig. 1) and which, due to its low material volume, has low thermal capacity. The toned image is applied to the drum by conventional means; however, conductive toner can be used because transfer is not performed electrostatically. The use of conductive toners allows magnestylus technology to be incorporated. This technology uses a magnetic conductive toner which is deposited on the dielectric surface by an array of styli in the development nip which are used to selectively induce charge in the toner. The toner is transported to the nip and controlled there by a conventional magnetic core, as shown in Fig. 1.

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Electrostatic Page Printer Using a Thermal Trans-Fix Station and a Thin- Wall Electrostatic Drum

We have demonstrated the feasibility of an electrostatic printer using a thin-wall aluminum image drum which is coated with a dialectic (Fig. 1) and which, due to its low material volume, has low thermal capacity. The toned image is applied to the drum by conventional means; however, conductive toner can be used because transfer is not performed electrostatically. The use of conductive toners allows magnestylus technology to be incorporated. This technology uses a magnetic conductive toner which is deposited on the dielectric surface by an array of styli in the development nip which are used to selectively induce charge in the toner. The toner is transported to the nip and controlled there by a conventional magnetic core, as shown in Fig. 1. On the interior of the drum a high intensity lamp and reflector are used locally to heat adjacent to or just prior to a soft pressure roll. The heat passing through the drum melts the toner which is fused onto the paper at low pressures. In this process, heat must not be allowed to travel to the developer station as the toner would be fused right there. One source of heat transfer to the developer area is by tangential conduction through the aluminum image drum. (Radiation transfer is minimized by a reflector.) This problem is solved by the fact that the image drum ro

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tates away from the developer station at a velo...