Browse Prior Art Database

Software-Controlled Component Feeder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039096D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McKillop, AJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

To ensure reliable high speed feeding of components to a manufacturing station or cell, all reject components must be removed. A vibratory bowl feeder uses opto-electric gates controlled by software to detect out-of-tolerance components which are rejected. These reject components are tracked by a control system so that on arrival at an eject station, they may be removed by an air jet. High volume, low cost and defect-free manufacturing require automated assembly cells with very high reliability levels. If component conformance to specification is maintained at 99.9%, then several components per hour can create a system fault. Fig. 1 shows a vibratory bowl feeder with stations 1 to 4 checking component tolerance, station 5 ejecting, station 6 preventing jams, and station 7 checking the component flow of reject-free components.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Software-Controlled Component Feeder

To ensure reliable high speed feeding of components to a manufacturing station or cell, all reject components must be removed. A vibratory bowl feeder uses opto-electric gates controlled by software to detect out-of-tolerance components which are rejected. These reject components are tracked by a control system so that on arrival at an eject station, they may be removed by an air jet. High volume, low cost and defect-free manufacturing require automated assembly cells with very high reliability levels. If component conformance to specification is maintained at 99.9%, then several components per hour can create a system fault. Fig. 1 shows a vibratory bowl feeder with stations 1 to 4 checking component tolerance, station 5 ejecting, station 6 preventing jams, and station 7 checking the component flow of reject-free components. Streams of oriented and separated components using conventional bowl- feeding techniques are presented to the first fibre-optic gate to check

(Image Omitted)

minimum and maximum component height. Referring to Fig. 2, minimum height- detector 1, the leading edge of the component is also detected in this position in order to initiate the height-checking routine. The acceptance conditions for this test are: minimum height detector on and maximum height detector off when the leading edge detector triggers the test sequence. Similar optical gates 2, 3, 4 are positioned on the perimeter of the bowl feeder to chec...