Browse Prior Art Database

Pick-Up Tool With Optical Sensing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039098D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Couper, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the automatic assembly of printed circuit boards, rectangular surface mounted-components are held in carrying trays with limited control of component alignment. A robot gripper includes three optical sensors in triangular formation which permits software to compute a corner of the component as the gripper is moved and rotated, and hence to accurately pick up the component. (Image Omitted) The problem is to pick rectangular surface-mounted components from carrying trays, then accurately populate circuit boards using robots. The components lie loose within rectangular tray sections (Fig. 1). Hence, before accurate placement can be performed, the component must be accurately picked.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 71% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Pick-Up Tool With Optical Sensing

In the automatic assembly of printed circuit boards, rectangular surface mounted-components are held in carrying trays with limited control of component alignment. A robot gripper includes three optical sensors in triangular formation which permits software to compute a corner of the component as the gripper is moved and rotated, and hence to accurately pick up the component.

(Image Omitted)

The problem is to pick rectangular surface-mounted components from carrying trays, then accurately populate circuit boards using robots. The components lie loose within rectangular tray sections (Fig. 1). Hence, before accurate placement can be performed, the component must be accurately picked. This could be done by first picking the component roughly from the tray and then placing it in some form of locating jig, which would square it up, then repicking the component from the jig and continuing to placement stage. This disclosure offers an alternative solution. The robot gripper consists of a vacuum pick head as normal to grip the components, and three optical sensors 1, 2, 3 to sense the component, as in Fig.
2. Using these three sensors and the robot's move and monitor commands, the robot is programmed to find the corner point of the component and, hence, be able to accurately pick the components. Fig. 4 shows a flowchart describing the algorithm that is used to find the corner. It refers to the diagram in Fig. 3. This technique is of par...