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Method to Finally "Commit" a Set of Recently Applied Software Updates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039141D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Emry, CA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method is described which, after a set of updates are applied, provides the user with a test period where he can insure that the recent updates do not perturb his system in some unexpected way. After the test period, the method permits the user to either "commit" or "reject" the updates. Software updates for multiple licensed program products (LPPs) are sometimes packaged together on the same distribution media. The user selects LPPs for which he wants to apply updates. After the updates are applied, he needs to be able to selectively "commit" or "reject" the complete set of updates for each LPP based on the results of a test period. Without this reject capability, the user would have to either restore a system backup or reinstall the LPP that he wants to reject and then reapply any previous updates to that LPP.

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Method to Finally "Commit" a Set of Recently Applied Software Updates

A method is described which, after a set of updates are applied, provides the user with a test period where he can insure that the recent updates do not perturb his system in some unexpected way. After the test period, the method permits the user to either "commit" or "reject" the updates. Software updates for multiple licensed program products (LPPs) are sometimes packaged together on the same distribution media. The user selects LPPs for which he wants to apply updates. After the updates are applied, he needs to be able to selectively "commit" or "reject" the complete set of updates for each LPP based on the results of a test period. Without this reject capability, the user would have to either restore a system backup or reinstall the LPP that he wants to reject and then reapply any previous updates to that LPP. Assume an example where two different users, on System A and System B, both have the same LPPs installed. However, the user on System B has made modifications that are not on System A. All of the LPPs on both systems are at the same update level. They both receive the same update diskette that includes updates for several of the LPPs on their systems, and they both apply all of the applicable updates. During testing, the user on System A encounters no problems, but the user on System B discovers that one or more of the recent updates are incompatible with his local modifications. The user on System A needs to be able to "commit" all of the updates, but the user on System B needs to be able to selectively "commit" those that are compatible with his local modifications and to selectively "reject" those that are incompatible. In accordance with the new method, a user initiates an update by executing the "updatep" command. There are four basic actions that are performed by update: 1. Apply selected LPP updates from the distribution media.

2. Commit selected LPP updates that have been applied.

3. Reject selected LPP updates that have been applied.

4. Present status about all currently applied LPP updates.

The user must c...