Browse Prior Art Database

ASCII Terminal Data Stream Translation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039145D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miller, GW: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described which allows different types of ASCII terminals to coexist. The IBM RT PC provides ASCII terminal support for ASCII terminals from many different manufacturers. Many of these ASCII terminals have different character to code-point correspondences, and none of the ASCII terminals have character to code-point correspondences which totally match the character to code-point correspondence of the RT PC. Additionally, ASCII terminals from different manufacturers can co-exist on an RT PC. The support of ASCII terminals from different manufacturers does not present a significant problem in the United States because the United States ASCII character to code-point correspondence is well standardized.

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ASCII Terminal Data Stream Translation

A method is described which allows different types of ASCII terminals to coexist. The IBM RT PC provides ASCII terminal support for ASCII terminals from many different manufacturers. Many of these ASCII terminals have different character to code-point correspondences, and none of the ASCII terminals have character to code-point correspondences which totally match the character to code-point correspondence of the RT PC. Additionally, ASCII terminals from different manufacturers can co-exist on an RT PC. The support of ASCII terminals from different manufacturers does not present a significant problem in the United States because the United States ASCII character to code-point correspondence is well standardized. However, this is not the case in other countries where ASCII terminals from different manufacturers can have vastly different character to code-point correspondence and even terminals from the same manufacturer can have different character to code-point correspondence in different countries. This situation can present severe problems for the user who may use one ASCII terminal to create a text file and another ASCII terminal to update the same text file. Since the character to code-point correspondence between the ASCII terminals may be different, confusion can arise between what the user entered into the text file and what is actually interpreted from the ASCII terminal(s). For example, the user can enter a character on one ASCII terminal, say, a c-cedilla capital, and have that code-point be interpreted as a different character on another ASCII terminal, say, an e-umlaut small or some other character. This situation is clearly not workable in a multi-terminal environment. To further illustrate, a message sent from one ASCII terminal to another ASCII terminal displays as gobbledygook due to misinterpretation of the code-poin...