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Methods for Improving Readability and Durability of High-Capacity, Reflective, Liquid Crystal Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039158D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Demke, KR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Methods are described which lead to reduced glare from high-capacity, reflective, liquid crystal displays allowing increased readability. Not only is glare reduced, but durability is improved as well. The twisted nematic liquid crystal display (LCD), shown in Fig. 1, consists of many layers of material that are laminated together, as illustrated in Fig. 2. As can be seen, the outer surface is a polarizer made of plastic. Being plastic, this surface tends to be shiny and easy to scratch. It is very undesirable to have a display that has poor durability and creates glare. To protect the polarizer, a non-bonded hardened plastic layer (usually PLEXIGLASS*) is a common solution used in the industry. However, without bonding to the polarizer, an air gap is created between this new layer and the polarizer behind it.

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Methods for Improving Readability and Durability of High-Capacity, Reflective, Liquid Crystal Displays

Methods are described which lead to reduced glare from high-capacity, reflective, liquid crystal displays allowing increased readability. Not only is glare reduced, but durability is improved as well. The twisted nematic liquid crystal display (LCD), shown in Fig. 1, consists of many layers of material that are laminated together, as illustrated in Fig. 2. As can be seen, the outer surface is a polarizer made of plastic. Being plastic, this surface tends to be shiny and easy to scratch. It is very undesirable to have a display that has poor durability and creates glare. To protect the polarizer, a non-bonded hardened plastic layer (usually PLEXIGLASS*) is a common solution used in the industry. However, without bonding to the polarizer, an air gap is created between this new layer and the polarizer behind it. This air gap acts as another source of glare since it causes internal reflections, even if the outer (first) surface is treated to reduce glare. Since reflective LCDs are passive devices, they require ambient light to pass through all the layers and reflect back out in order to be readable. In fact, the more light that passes through the LCD, the easier it is to read. Unfortunately though, if this ambient light is reflecting off either the outer surface or an internal surface before reaching the reflector, this produces glare and lowers contrast, thus leading to a reduction in readability. If the glare is excessive, it may make the display totally unreadable. Thu...