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Dynamic Selection of Run-Time Attribute Support

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039163D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baumgartner, DM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is described which gives the user/programmer control of the available attributes/colors/fonts in a limited data space environment for UNIX*-type supported display terminals. As display terminals become more advanced, they have the capability of providing many different character attributes/colors/fonts for each character on the screen. The many combinations of these attributes can very rapidly take up an excessive amount of storage per character in a program wishing to use them.

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Dynamic Selection of Run-Time Attribute Support

A method is described which gives the user/programmer control of the available attributes/colors/fonts in a limited data space environment for UNIX*-type supported display terminals. As display terminals become more advanced, they have the capability of providing many different character attributes/colors/fonts for each character on the screen. The many combinations of these attributes can very rapidly take up an excessive amount of storage per character in a program wishing to use them. A previous attempt to handle this problem was to allow for the "most common" attributes to be stored in an 8-bit data structure, thus limiting the attributes available to those selected by the programmer as "most common" - regardless of whether or not those attributes are the ones desired or whether they are actually available on a particular display terminal. Since not all display terminals support the same set of attributes/fonts/colors, the user/programmer is allowed to choose (prioritize) which attributes are stored in the 8-bit data structure in this improved method. Two new things result from this: 1. An interface is provided to the user/programmer allowing him to choose (in order

of importance) which attributes are to be

available during this run (initially it can be

changed at any time). Based on the actual

capabilities of the display terminal, the

user/programmer's choices are filled--those

attributes chosen, but not availa...