Browse Prior Art Database

Programmable Hand Rest Option for Laser-Scanned Touch Entry Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039233D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cato, RT: AUTHOR

Abstract

A known touch entry display 1 and its associated processor controls are modified to provide (1) normal mode of operation to sense the position of an operator's finger or other passive input probe relative to its CRT face 2, or alternatively, (2) a mode of operation permitting the operator to rest his hand, arm and ruler on 2 without interfering with a probe input, i.e., a "hand rest" mode. The known display is characterized by laser beam sources 3 and 4, rotating polygons 5 and 6 with scanning mirrors, photodiodes 7 and 8 and a strip of retro-reflective material 9 to reflect the scanning laser beams to 7 and 8 via light collecting lens 10 and 11. As 5 and 6 rotate, each mirror causes its respective beam to scan across 2 as illustrated at 12A, B, C and 13A, B, C.

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Programmable Hand Rest Option for Laser-Scanned Touch Entry Display

A known touch entry display 1 and its associated processor controls are modified to provide (1) normal mode of operation to sense the position of an operator's finger or other passive input probe relative to its CRT face 2, or alternatively, (2) a mode of operation permitting the operator to rest his hand, arm and ruler on 2 without interfering with a probe input, i.e., a "hand rest" mode. The known display is characterized by laser beam sources 3 and 4, rotating polygons 5 and 6 with scanning mirrors, photodiodes 7 and 8 and a strip of retro- reflective material 9 to reflect the scanning laser beams to 7 and 8 via light collecting lens 10 and 11. As 5 and 6 rotate, each mirror causes its respective beam to scan across 2 as illustrated at 12A, B, C and 13A, B, C. When a passive probe interrupts the light beams 12, 13 during scanning, the processor under program control determines the X-Y coordinate position of the probe rela

(Image Omitted)

tive to 2. Without modification, this known display will recognize an operator's hand or arm as an input probe, thus preventing a "hand rest" mode of operation. The improvement, to permit alternative modes of operation, is effected by using two sets of rotating mirror facets 5a, 5b (Fig. 2) and 6A, 6B (Fig. 1) on the polygons, a fence 9 in which only the bottom half 9a is retro-reflective and the upper half 9b is a black non-reflecting surface, as illustrated in Fig. 2, and probe 15 with retro- reflective material 15A at one end thereof. One set of facets on each polygon deflects the beam in a plane 14a perpendicular to the axes of the polygons so that it strikes the retro-reflective surface 9a for detection...