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Reproduction of Chinese Ideograms

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039274D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cheung, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

Previous articles relating to the reproduction of Chinese ideograms have discussed the use of keyboards in which individual keys correspond to the various "strokes" by which the ideograms are built, automatically or manually. However, considering that there are about 34 different strokes involved, with many of them being quite similar in many respects, the selection of any particular stroke could, obviously, become quite a confusing and time consuming matter. This present disclosure proposes a reduction in the overall number of strokes through the use of a compromising step wherein single strokes, where possible, are used to represent groups of similar strokes, respectively.

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Reproduction of Chinese Ideograms

Previous articles relating to the reproduction of Chinese ideograms have discussed the use of keyboards in which individual keys correspond to the various "strokes" by which the ideograms are built, automatically or manually. However, considering that there are about 34 different strokes involved, with many of them being quite similar in many respects, the selection of any particular stroke could, obviously, become quite a confusing and time consuming matter. This present disclosure proposes a reduction in the overall number of strokes through the use of a compromising step wherein single strokes, where possible, are used to represent groups of similar strokes, respectively. It has been found that six strokes, as mapped in the conventional keyboard illustrated in the figure to the lower case characters "d"; "f";"j";"k";"l" and "s", affords the reproduction of any ideograms. It will be clear that this new system is "open" in the sense that any new character created can be readily accommodated, and, further, since only a very few strokes are used, and these strokes are reproduced exactly as in handwriting, it is a very easy system for a user to learn. Two of the major advantages in this "stroke" reduction technique reside in a lessening of initial "thinking" time and a decrease in actual input or keying time.

Having reduced the number of basic strokes to six, there is now room on the conventional keyboard for about 56 of the most c...