Browse Prior Art Database

Silver Alloy Electrodes in Electrochromic Display Module

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039318D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barclay, DJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In an electrochromic display module with silver pel electrodes, frequently written pels darken relative to infrequently written pels. This delineation problem is reduced by using silver alloy containing relatively small amounts of the alloying metal. The delineation problem has been shown to be caused by a restructuring of the silver pel surface. Essentially silver is removed, during cycling, from high energy grain boundaries and redeposited on lower energy crystal faces. It is known from the literature that a few tenths of a percent and below of alloying metals, such as Cu and Pd, significantly increase the recrystallization temperature of silver, and it could therefore be expected that these alloying elements would favorably influence restructuring. Additions of up to 0.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 90% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Silver Alloy Electrodes in Electrochromic Display Module

In an electrochromic display module with silver pel electrodes, frequently written pels darken relative to infrequently written pels. This delineation problem is reduced by using silver alloy containing relatively small amounts of the alloying metal. The delineation problem has been shown to be caused by a restructuring of the silver pel surface. Essentially silver is removed, during cycling, from high energy grain boundaries and redeposited on lower energy crystal faces. It is known from the literature that a few tenths of a percent and below of alloying metals, such as Cu and Pd, significantly increase the recrystallization temperature of silver, and it could therefore be expected that these alloying elements would favorably influence restructuring. Additions of up to 0.5% of Pd have been found to alter the grain structure of silver, the effect being to produce an alloy with sharply defined grain boundaries of low density compared to pure silver. Experiments have indicated that a significant improvement in delineation also occurs. Additionally, these silver/palladium alloys have reflectivity close to that of pure silver but unlike 100% Ag, they can be annealed at 360OEC without loss of reflectivity. They also etch more slowly than pure Ag, thus giving a more controllable etch process so that the 'undercut' during etching is superior to that achieved with pure silver. This idea is not restricted to Ag/0.5%...