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Alphabet Analysis for Hebrew

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039331D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Smith, DK: AUTHOR

Abstract

The Hebrew alphabet contains twenty-two characters, but in Hebrew text, some of the characters, depending on their position within a word, are presented in different character shapes. Five Hebrew characters have two distinct shapes for use in different positions. These particular characters have one shape for the beginning and middle positions in a word, and another shape for the end of word position ( KAPH,MEM,NUN,PE,CADHE ). Current Hebrew keyboard layouts use twenty-seven keys to represent the twenty-two characters in the alphabet, but it is desirable to have a keyboard design having a simplified layout for the language with a reduced number of keys covering the alphabet.

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Alphabet Analysis for Hebrew

The Hebrew alphabet contains twenty-two characters, but in Hebrew text, some of the characters, depending on their position within a word, are presented in different character shapes. Five Hebrew characters have two distinct shapes for use in different positions. These particular characters have one shape for the beginning and middle positions in a word, and another shape for the end of word position ( KAPH,MEM,NUN,PE,CADHE ). Current Hebrew keyboard layouts use twenty-seven keys to represent the twenty-two characters in the alphabet, but it is desirable to have a keyboard design having a simplified layout for the language with a reduced number of keys covering the alphabet. A simplified system according to the present disclosure displays all character shapes by an analysis of the representation of the alphabet in a data stream. The keyboard sends one character shape per alphabetical character into the data stream. The interface for the system is the data stream where access to the information is provided. A set of shaping attributes is provided from an analysis of the stream contents. These shaping attributes are updated, as a function of time, by the occurrence of a realtime event. A current character is analyzed and the corresponding value of the shaping attribute, as shown in the table on the next page, is created. Receiving a succeeding character from the data stream causes the invention logic to store the old value of the shapin...