Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Validation of Scripts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039371D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Metwaly, MF: AUTHOR

Abstract

There exists a need in automatic (and manual) script generation systems to check that words in a natural language are correctly written in accordance with the syntax of the script of that language, and this need varies in degree from one language to another. (Image Omitted) It has been found that a common or language-independent approach can be taken to satisfy the above need, providing that a given script can be formalized in equations. In essence, the general approach can be expressed through the following method steps: 1. Formally define the grammar (syntax) of the script in question. 2. Convert the syntax to a finite-state machine. 3. Build a script-parser based on 2. 4. Provide an error-handling process.

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Automatic Validation of Scripts

There exists a need in automatic (and manual) script generation systems to check that words in a natural language are correctly written in accordance with the syntax of the script of that language, and this need varies in degree from one language to another.

(Image Omitted)

It has been found that a common or language-independent approach can be taken to satisfy the above need, providing that a given script can be formalized in equations. In essence, the general approach can be expressed through the following method steps: 1. Formally define the grammar (syntax) of the script in question. 2. Convert the syntax to a finite-state machine.

3. Build a script-parser based on 2. 4. Provide an error-handling process.

(Image Omitted)

While the application of this present system will be described in relation to the reproduction of Arabic script, such application is not, of course, exhaustive. The system could, for example, be used in relation to English long-hand, etc. With reference to Canadian Patent Number 1,207,905, issued July 15, 1986, the production rules for writing Arabic words can be derived in terms of character groups using Backus-Naur form. The character groups are: SEND, SBND, SMND, SFND, which are the end, begin, middle and

free-standing shapes of "non-dividing"

Arabic characters, respectively.

SFD and SCD, are the free-standing and the connecting shapes of

"dividing" characters.

ST, which is the set of delimiters (space, non-alp...