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Browse Prior Art Database

Superimposed Graphic IMAGE Aids MILLING MACHINE Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039381D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Roucek, JA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The removal of a circuit defect from a printed circuit board or the like by a milling machine is aided by using a superimposed graphic image in those situations where dimensional constraints limit the actual view. The procedure is as follows. The defect site is positioned directly under a video camera that TRANSMITS THE MAGNIFIED IMAGE TO A MONITOR. THE MILLING MACHINE USES A .008-INCH-DIAMETER END MILL OR A SINGLE POINT FLYCUTTER CUTTING .006 inch diameter, located a discrete distance from camera axis, to mill through an epoxy novalac coating down to the level where the circuit line and the adjacent epoxy novalac coating join between the circuit lines.

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Superimposed Graphic IMAGE Aids MILLING MACHINE Control

The removal of a circuit defect from a printed circuit board or the like by a milling machine is aided by using a superimposed graphic image in those situations where dimensional constraints limit the actual view. The procedure is as follows. The defect site is positioned directly under a video camera that TRANSMITS THE MAGNIFIED IMAGE TO A MONITOR. THE MILLING MACHINE USES A .008-INCH-DIAMETER END MILL OR A SINGLE POINT FLYCUTTER CUTTING .006 inch diameter, located a discrete distance from camera axis, to mill through an epoxy novalac coating down to the level where the circuit line and the adjacent epoxy novalac coating join between the circuit lines. The video camera monitor screen interacts with a light pen and is marked with a light pen to indicate the start and stop of the mill cut relative to the adjacent circuits indicated by the superimposed graphic image. The graphic simulation image is created from glass master image data and pertains to the particular circuit configuration at the defect site. The marking of the start and stop points with light pen on screen to determine linear cutter travel path utilizes computer software to prevent the miller cutter from machining into a restricted area, e.g., an adjacent circuit land, a circuit line during a short removal, or to steer the cutter around a corner of circuit line or circuit land. Prior to starting the cut, the table indexes over the discrete distance required, placing the defect under the cutter. When this occurs, the actual image to the operator is replaced by the graphic image. When the milling starts, the cutter on its downfeed is in a graphic circle that represents the diameter of the cutter as shown at the start of the indicated mill cut in the graphic simulation of the previous actual image. Th...