Browse Prior Art Database

Wheel Configuration Robot With Laser/Ccd Position-Sensing Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039448D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ross, AI: AUTHOR

Abstract

A circular rim mounted horizontally and suspended from a ceiling by a central pillar supports two or more robot arms, each capable of moving around the rim and working in the general area below the rim. Included is a device for sensing the position of the robot around the rim including a laser mounted on the robot and a charge-coupled device (CCD) near the central pillar. As shown in Fig. 1, the rim 10 is supported by a central pillar 11 which may be roof-mounted, with support spokes 12 mounting the rim to the pillar. Robotic arms 13, 14, 15 are mounted on the circular rim such that they can move around the rim.

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Wheel Configuration Robot With Laser/Ccd Position-Sensing Device

A circular rim mounted horizontally and suspended from a ceiling by a central pillar supports two or more robot arms, each capable of moving around the rim and working in the general area below the rim. Included is a device for sensing the position of the robot around the rim including a laser mounted on the robot and a charge-coupled device (CCD) near the central pillar. As shown in Fig. 1, the rim 10 is supported by a central pillar 11 which may be roof-mounted, with support spokes 12 mounting the rim to the pillar. Robotic arms 13, 14, 15 are mounted on the circular rim such that they can move around the rim. This arrangement gives the advantages that more than one robot can easily work in the same general work area at the same time and, if one robot fails or requires maintenance, another on the rim can continue in operation with only a slightly reduced working area available since it will generally have a choice of two routes from its current position to its desired position and only one of these would be made unavailable by the inoperative robot. As shown in Fig. 2, a CCD 16 is arranged near the central pillar 11, and a laser 17 is positioned on a robot 13 with beam 18 directed towards the central pillar. Also shown is the robot in another position 13' with laser in position 17', and it can be seen that the laser beam 18' impinges on the CCD at a different location. Therefore, data read from the CCD can be used by a robot controller to determine the position of the robot. CCDs are currently...