Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Producing Thin, STIFF, Hard WIRES for Electro-Erosion Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039588D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hodgson, RT: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby wires, used as electrodes in electro- erosion printers, are fabricated in such a way so as to resist bending and breakage. The concept changes the grain structure of the wire, used as the electrodes in the printer, by applying radio frequency (RF) heating combined with chemical vapor deposition to produce extremely strong and stiff wire electrodes from small-diameter wire. The print resolution of the electro-erosion printer is dependent upon the diameter of the tungsten wires used as electrodes, typically .003" IN DIAMETER. SMALLER DIAMETER WIRES ARE NOT STIFF ENOUGH TO resist bending and breaking.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Method of Producing Thin, STIFF, Hard WIRES for Electro-Erosion Printers

A technique is described whereby wires, used as electrodes in electro- erosion printers, are fabricated in such a way so as to resist bending and breakage. The concept changes the grain structure of the wire, used as the electrodes in the printer, by applying radio frequency (RF) heating combined with chemical vapor deposition to produce extremely strong and stiff wire electrodes from small-diameter wire. The print resolution of the electro-erosion printer is dependent upon the diameter of the tungsten wires used as electrodes, typically .003" IN DIAMETER. SMALLER DIAMETER WIRES ARE NOT STIFF ENOUGH
TO resist bending and breaking. However, by using small-diameter wire and depositing tungsten and carbon onto the wire, the small amount of tungsten carbide changes the grain structure so that the resulting material is harder than sintered tungsten carbide and stronger and stiffer than tool steel. The bonding modulus is approximately 500,000 psi so the resulting material is typically twenty times stronger than tungsten. The typical Vickers hardness of the finished product is 1750 +200. _ By using the fixture, as shown in the figure, a wire material with 99% tungsten can have 1% tungsten carbide deposited on wire by chemical vapor deposition of WF6 + CH4 + H2 mixtures. Wire 10, typically a high temperature ductile material such as tantalum or 80% Ta - 10% W, approximately .0005" diameter, is vacuum...