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Method for Controlling the Characteristics of Semiconductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039613D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Batra, IP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the manufacture of semiconductor devices, it is highly desirable to be able to control the electronic properties of the semiconductor, in particular, its conductivity, at will. A method to do this is by metal deposition on the semiconductor surface. For example, potassium atoms are adsorbed on a Si (111)-(2x1) surface strongly and ionically. Up to a threshold coverage, the potassium electrons are donated to the empty f*-band, resulting in a 1-D metallic system. Above the threshold, the Fermi level crosses the bulk conduction-band minimum, and the potassium electrons are transferred into the lowest bulk conduction-band and thus become itinerant, leading to a metallization of the semiconductor surface.

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Method for Controlling the Characteristics of Semiconductors

In the manufacture of semiconductor devices, it is highly desirable to be able to control the electronic properties of the semiconductor, in particular, its conductivity, at will. A method to do this is by metal deposition on the semiconductor surface. For example, potassium atoms are adsorbed on a Si (111)-(2x1) surface strongly and ionically. Up to a threshold coverage, the potassium electrons are donated to the empty f*-band, resulting in a 1-D metallic system. Above the threshold, the Fermi level crosses the bulk conduction-band minimum, and the potassium electrons are transferred into the lowest bulk conduction-band and thus become itinerant, leading to a metallization of the semiconductor surface. This critical adsorption coverage gives rise to the same physical effects as bulk doping would, but without introducing any scattering centers in the bulk. The absence of scattering centers is a prerequisite to high carrier mobility and, hence, improved conductivity.

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