Browse Prior Art Database

Marking Method for Covered Electronic Assemblies

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039614D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lentz, JW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The invention provides for marking unique and customized information onto product labels, eliminating the need for pre-printed labels. The means of marking breaks the marking into two parts, constant data and product unique data. This allows programmable marking of product on demand. Constant data is shown in Fig. 1 and can be either a silk screen mark, transfer mark or label. The mark or label is then placed on a frame or product so it can be seen from the outside of the product. The label is then marked with product unique data via a laser by discoloring or burning the label with the appropriate data. In an application of marking serial numbers (S/Ns) on a label, such as on a card cover assembly, the data needed has been stored in memory on the card. The flow is as shown in Fig. 2.

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Marking Method for Covered Electronic Assemblies

The invention provides for marking unique and customized information onto product labels, eliminating the need for pre-printed labels. The means of marking breaks the marking into two parts, constant data and product unique data. This allows programmable marking of product on demand. Constant data is shown in Fig. 1 and can be either a silk screen mark, transfer mark or label. The mark or label is then placed on a frame or product so it can be seen from the outside of the product. The label is then marked with product unique data via a laser by discoloring or burning the label with the appropriate data. In an application of marking serial numbers (S/Ns) on a label, such as on a card cover assembly, the data needed has been stored in memory on the card. The flow is as shown in Fig. 2. In this case, the S/N, which must be assigned to a component at the component level, allows the product to be serialized without secondary marking or special handling.

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