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Improved Method of Residual Quartz Removal Using Multilayer Etch Mask

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039621D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fredericks, EC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In semiconductor manufacturing, quartz is often used as an insulator between conducting metal levels. Referring to Fig. 1, metal line 10 on substrate 12 has a conformal layer of quartz 14 applied as an insulator. When the quartz 14 is applied, a peak 16 often is formed over the metal line 10. After subsequent contact definition and etching, some residual quartz 18 can remain in the contact via as seen in Fig. 2. This can lead to subsequent problems. The addition of a layer of polymeric material on top of the quartz layer can minimize this problem. Referring to Fig. 3, a layer 20 which can be polyamic acid, polyimide, polyvinylcarbazole, polycarbonate, or polysulfone, with or without dyes or photo-sensitive agents, can be applied on the quartz layer 14 and baked.

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Improved Method of Residual Quartz Removal Using Multilayer Etch Mask

In semiconductor manufacturing, quartz is often used as an insulator between conducting metal levels. Referring to Fig. 1, metal line 10 on substrate 12 has a conformal layer of quartz 14 applied as an insulator. When the quartz 14 is applied, a peak 16 often is formed over the metal line 10. After subsequent contact definition and etching, some residual quartz 18 can remain in the contact via as seen in Fig. 2. This can lead to subsequent problems. The addition of a layer of polymeric material on top of the quartz layer can minimize this problem. Referring to Fig. 3, a layer 20 which can be polyamic acid, polyimide, polyvinylcarbazole, polycarbonate, or polysulfone, with or without dyes or photo- sensitive agents, can be applied on the quartz layer 14 and baked. Then, a layer of photoresist 22 is applied, exposed and developed. At this step, either the polymeric layer 20 will be developed along with the photoresist 22, or a

(Image Omitted)

separate etching of the polymeric layer 20 is performed. Next, the quartz layer 14 is dry etched using a CF4/O2 gas mixture. The polymeric layer 20 will etch 25 to 50 percent slower than the photoresist layer 22 and will provide better image size control, thereby allowing over etch of the quartz to remove the peak. The resulting profile can be seen in Fig. 4. With this invention, over etch of the quartz peak can be accomplished without degradation of image c...