Browse Prior Art Database

Error Assistance in One-Step Menu-Driven Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039672D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cabaniss, JM: AUTHOR

Abstract

In menu-driven applications, each menu selection causes either a function to be performed or a new menu to be displayed. System implementations include a one-step process that allows the user to make a number of menu selections at one time in a single input data stream. This article describes a method of error detection and error assistance should an error be encountered using the one-step method. Since each (Image Omitted) menu provides the user with all of the information necessary to make a selection for it, the best way to help the user correct his error would be to present him with the menu for which the item was invalid, along with the appropriate error message. A flow diagram illustrating the sequence of operations is shown in Fig. 1.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Error Assistance in One-Step Menu-Driven Applications

In menu-driven applications, each menu selection causes either a function to be performed or a new menu to be displayed. System implementations include a one-step process that allows the user to make a number of menu selections at one time in a single input data stream. This article describes a method of error detection and error assistance should an error be encountered using the one- step method. Since each

(Image Omitted)

menu provides the user with all of the information necessary to make a selection for it, the best way to help the user correct his error would be to present him with the menu for which the item was invalid, along with the appropriate error message. A flow diagram illustrating the sequence of operations is shown in Fig.
1. Multi-menu one-step input is distinguished from single-menu selection by the use of a trigger character, while options and parameters are separated by a common delimiter. A terminating character is also required to delineate the end of the input stream. When an error is encountered, a unique code for that specific error is set and control returns to the supervisor module. At this point it is known that the last option processed either was invalid, contained invalid parameters, or caused an error to be encountered when it was executed. A new input stream that includes only those options that were successfully processed,
i.e., all those options up to, but not including, the last option processed is created. This new input stream is valid (it will not cause any errors), and it will terminate processing at the menu that contains the information relative to the error. Processing is now repeated with this new input stream; when control returns to the Supervisor Module, the proper menu will have been placed in an internal buffer. The Supervisor Module adds the proper error message (based on the code set when the error was encountered), restores the user's original input, sets the cursor under the item in error, and displays the menu in error on the user's terminal. All terminal I/O operations are performed by the Supervisor Module. The user's screen is read, proc...