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Symbol Set Management With Multiple Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039697D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anthias, T: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a method of resolving conflicts that arise when many applications share a screen and have differing symbol set requirements. In a windowing environment, it is possible to have several applications displayed simultaneously and requiring the use of the same symbol-set 'slots' or logical identifiers. If there are no conflicting requirements between the applications, then each application is able to use the correct device symbol-set resource. However, if there is a conflict between applications running in different windows, a set of priorities apply. When a conflict does arise, then the use of the symbol-set 'slots' and logical identifiers in conflict is allocated to the application using the highest priority window of the applications in conflict.

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Symbol Set Management With Multiple Applications

This article describes a method of resolving conflicts that arise when many applications share a screen and have differing symbol set requirements. In a windowing environment, it is possible to have several applications displayed simultaneously and requiring the use of the same symbol-set 'slots' or logical identifiers. If there are no conflicting requirements between the applications, then each application is able to use the correct device symbol-set resource. However, if there is a conflict between applications running in different windows, a set of priorities apply. When a conflict does arise, then the use of the symbol-set 'slots' and logical identifiers in conflict is allocated to the application using the highest priority window of the applications in conflict. Thus, when the current window uses a specific symbol-set 'slot' in conflict with its use by another window, the current window ought to have its requests honored since it will be of a higher priority. Wherever possible, the applications running in lower priority windows ought to appear correct in spite of the conflicts. Therefore, when the symbol-set in conflict and the device permit, the use of the symbol-set may be emulated in the host by 'stroking out' the characters line by line or using graphic image orders, thus maintaining the integrity of the application. Where, however, such emulation is not possible, then the default symbol set would be used...