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Variable Object Space in Mixed Object DOCUMENT Content Architecture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039732D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 5 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pascoe, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

By allowing the size and shape of the Revision Text Object Content Architecture (RTOCA) object space to be variable and defined by the page layout of the presentation, a text object in the Mixed Object Document Content Architecture (MO:DCA) can take the shape of the object area to which it is assigned. (Image Omitted) In one data stream environment, the page layout is defined by the MO:DCA which allows for the definition of rectangular areas to which data is assigned and in which the data will be presented. These are called object areas, as illustrated in Fig. 1. For image and graphics data, it does not matter that the space occupied by the data is a different size than the MO:DCA area to which it is assigned.

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Variable Object Space in Mixed Object DOCUMENT Content Architecture

By allowing the size and shape of the Revision Text Object Content Architecture (RTOCA) object space to be variable and defined by the page layout of the presentation, a text object in the Mixed Object Document Content Architecture (MO:DCA) can take the shape of the object area to which it is assigned.

(Image Omitted)

In one data stream environment, the page layout is defined by the MO:DCA which allows for the definition of rectangular areas to which data is assigned and in which the data will be presented.

These are called object areas, as illustrated in Fig. 1. For image and graphics data, it does not matter that the space occupied by the data is a different size than the MO:DCA area to which it is assigned. The pictures can be scaled up or down to cause an accurate fit, or the data may be truncated showing only that portion that can be seen through the "window" created by the MO:DCA object area. However, this is not always the correct way of processing text data into these areas, as scaling may cause the characters to become unreadable, and truncating will cause data loss.

(Image Omitted)

In object content architectures, the object is defined independently of the layout. This allows the data to be defined and edited in its own environment, independent of the layout. The data may then be assigned to any of many different layouts as required by the user, without modification of the basic definition of the data.

To accomplish this, each Object Content Architecture (OCA) defines an object space. The object space is specified by controls and commands within the object and is therefore part of the object definition.

For text, the RTOCA defines this object space as a rectangular shape having an X-dimension, a Y-dimension, and an angle between the X and Y axes. The object space defines the location of a group of points which may be addressed for placement of characters. The edges of the object space are used to define the location of text parameters, such as the leading and trailing margins, tab positions, the inline and baseline directions, and the first presentation line. These parameters, in turn, help to define the location of characters on text lines and the position of text lines relative to one another as shown in Fig. 2. These positional relationships of characters and lines are determined through a series of processes called formatting,
i.e., the data in the revision text object are processed "into" the object space, with line endings, indentations, and other positional relationships determined from the size and shape of the object space.

Once the object data has been imaged in its space, the resulting formatted object space may be moved by other processes known as composition and positioned on a page defined by MO:DCA. This is done by assigning an object space to an object area defined by MO:DCA.

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The assignment is directed by MO:DCA control sequ...