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Queueing Algorithm for Inter-Task Communications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039776D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heath, AW: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described to consolidate as much information as possible into one inter-task communicating processing package without corrupting or missing critical data. Traditional communication between concurrent tasks or processes typically takes either of two approaches. One is pass every piece of information to the other process through a first in/first out queue, and the other approach is to sum information into one buffer which is periodically cleared by the other process. Either of these traditional solutions does not always meet the requirements when interfacing to pointing device (mouse) hardware.

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Queueing Algorithm for Inter-Task Communications

A method is described to consolidate as much information as possible into one inter-task communicating processing package without corrupting or missing critical data. Traditional communication between concurrent tasks or processes typically takes either of two approaches. One is pass every piece of information to the other process through a first in/first out queue, and the other approach is to sum information into one buffer which is periodically cleared by the other process. Either of these traditional solutions does not always meet the requirements when interfacing to pointing device (mouse) hardware. The first approach has the limitation of requiring a large queue in which to buffer all the intermediate data for the other process(s) to analyze but has the advantage in that all the information is preserved in the basic units. Obviously, a disadvantage is the extra processing overhead required to process additional data. The later approach has the advantage of consolidation of the data by the interrupt service routine into a concise package but that act can also cause information to be lost if the other processes cannot remove the information in a timely manner. Given a mouse that is moving across a screen, this device will send a vast amount of data to the processor relating to delta movement since the last time the mouse hardware sent the information. When the mouse is moving, this is a constant stream of data only limited by the physical characteristics of the attachment link. The system must process this delta positioning information in real time and keep the image updated on the dis...