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Tray for Manual Insertion of Paper Into a Sheet Feeder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039857D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buchanan, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A manual insert tray may be substituted for an automatic insert tray, thereby allowing for manual insertion of envelopes and paper to be printed by a printer using the sheet feeder. A sheet feeder 1 (Fig. 1) has two automatic insert trays (not shown) mounted in rectangular slots 2 and rectangular slots 3 in sidewalls 4 and 5. One of the two automatic insert trays is removed from the slots 2 or 3 and a manual insert tray 6 (Fig. 2) is substituted therefor through having its rectangularly shaped ends 7 disposed in the rectangular slots 2 or 3 of the sheet feeder 1. The tray 6 has a pair of substantially parallel and curved walls 8 and 9, with each of the walls 8 and 9 having a slot 10 therein to enable a user to be able to grasp a small document when disposing it between the walls 8 and 9.

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Tray for Manual Insertion of Paper Into a Sheet Feeder

A manual insert tray may be substituted for an automatic insert tray, thereby allowing for manual insertion of envelopes and paper to be printed by a printer using the sheet feeder. A sheet feeder 1 (Fig. 1) has two automatic insert trays (not shown) mounted in rectangular slots 2 and rectangular slots 3 in sidewalls 4 and 5. One of the two automatic insert trays is removed from the slots 2 or 3 and a manual insert tray 6 (Fig. 2) is substituted therefor through having its rectangularly shaped ends 7 disposed in the rectangular slots 2 or 3 of the sheet feeder 1. The tray 6 has a pair of substantially parallel and curved walls 8 and 9, with each of the walls 8 and 9 having a slot 10 therein to enable a user to be able to grasp a small document when disposing it between the walls 8 and 9. A sheet 11 of small size, such as a 3 x 5 card, for example, is positioned between the walls 8 and 9 so that it touches a roller 12, which is driven by a cone feed roller 13 of the feeder 1 (Fig. 1). Thus, when the cone feed roller 13 (Fig. 2) is driven, the roller 12 rotates to pull the sheet 11 of paper between the rollers 12 and 13 for further feeding.

(Image Omitted)

The sheet 11 of paper is held either against the top surface of the bottom wall 8 or the bottom surface of the top wall 9. For example, a pivotally mounted, weighted arm 14 may be utilized to act through a slot 15 in the top wall 9 to hold the sheet 11 of pap...