Browse Prior Art Database

Improved Continuous Chrome Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039934D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sharif, AU: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article concerns an enhanced process for removing unwanted parts of platinum and chrome barrier films previously deposited to prevent conductive metals, such as aluminum, from penetrating a silicon surface in the "contact region" of a semiconductor device structure. Barrier films, such as platinum and/or chromium, have been found to protect semiconductor device structure "contact regions" from unwanted penetration by conductive metals, such as aluminum or copper. Such penetration, particularly at the perimeter of a silicon-nitride- defined "contact region", has been identified as a significant cause of failure and must be prevented. The disclosed technique involves an improvement in existing processes for removing unwanted parts of these platinum and chrome films. Figs.

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Improved Continuous Chrome Process

This article concerns an enhanced process for removing unwanted parts of platinum and chrome barrier films previously deposited to prevent conductive metals, such as aluminum, from penetrating a silicon surface in the "contact region" of a semiconductor device structure. Barrier films, such as platinum and/or chromium, have been found to protect semiconductor device structure "contact regions" from unwanted penetration by conductive metals, such as aluminum or copper. Such penetration, particularly at the perimeter of a silicon- nitride- defined "contact region", has been identified as a significant cause of failure and must be prevented. The disclosed technique involves an improvement in existing processes for removing unwanted parts of these platinum and chrome films. Figs. 1-4 are unscaled to better illustrate the technique to be described. Fig. 1 shows the device structure after conventional block-out photolithography. Fig. 2 shows the same structure after chromium etch. Fig. 3 illustrates the remnant chromium "stud" following the completion of a platinum etch using aqua regia. Fig. 4 shows the desired continuous barrier layer remaining over the "contact region" after the final standard chromium deposition. Referring to Fig. 1, a chromium "dot" is formed in the desired "contact region" 1 of the silicon (epi) by a multi-step process involving platinum 2 deposition and sintering, chromium 3 deposition, and application of photo...