Browse Prior Art Database

Adaptive Integrated Microdiagnostics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039938D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Moran, DE: AUTHOR

Abstract

An autodiagnostic system known as adaptive integrated microdiagnostics (AIM) integrates test techniques under microcode control so that it can automatically move a microcode break point for the purpose of collecting hardware test data. Break point is the location in a program where a stop is made to transfer control. The host for AIM is a bubble memory unit (BMU), an avionic mass memory which operates under distributed multi-microprocessor control. These microprocessors are arranged such that each has access to the others for testing purposes. AIM is not dependent on the BMU and could be implemented on any processor-controlled host. AIM treats BMU system level autodiagnostics as a two-tier problem, performing card-level, then board level fault detection and isolation.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 68% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Adaptive Integrated Microdiagnostics

An autodiagnostic system known as adaptive integrated microdiagnostics (AIM) integrates test techniques under microcode control so that it can automatically move a microcode break point for the purpose of collecting hardware test data. Break point is the location in a program where a stop is made to transfer control. The host for AIM is a bubble memory unit (BMU), an avionic mass memory which operates under distributed multi-microprocessor control. These microprocessors are arranged such that each has access to the others for testing purposes. AIM is not dependent on the BMU and could be implemented on any processor- controlled host. AIM treats BMU system level autodiagnostics as a two-tier problem, performing card-level, then board level fault detection and isolation. AIM first determines the operational readiness of the card. Functional tests are performed according to a bottom up scheme that minimizes the amount of card logic under test at each step and builds on the logic already tested. A fault triggers the isolation process, which uses the non-functional nature of the detected fault to select a "candidate" chunk of logic which, allegedly, is faulty. AIM then attempts to prove its allegation by the interaction of the knowledge acquisition subsystem and inference to select tests to converge the isolation. In this manner AIM determines its own state of readiness at the card level. This process is performed on all cards in p...