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Local Arbiter Compete Function Test for Non-Maskable Interrupt Arbitration

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039974D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hausman, KA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a local arbiter compete function test is provided for computers equipped with non-maskable interrupt (NMI) arbitration. The concept tests the local arbiters' ability to compete and remove the device identifier from the arbitration bus in response to higher priority requests. (Image Omitted) During diagnostics or power-on testing, the diagnostic bit in the central arbiter port may be set to force the arbitration bus to zero, whenever master devices are competing for the bus ("+ARB/-GRANT" = 1). The technique, as shown in Fig. 1, allows the diagnostic bit to control the ARB bus. Diagnostic software can then program a local arbiter to request the bus. Each local arbiter is tested independently.

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Local Arbiter Compete Function Test for Non-Maskable Interrupt Arbitration

A technique is described whereby a local arbiter compete function test is provided for computers equipped with non-maskable interrupt (NMI) arbitration. The concept tests the local arbiters' ability to compete and remove the device identifier from the arbitration bus in response to higher priority requests.

(Image Omitted)

During diagnostics or power-on testing, the diagnostic bit in the central arbiter port may be set to force the arbitration bus to zero, whenever master devices are competing for the bus ("+ARB/-GRANT" = 1). The technique, as shown in Fig. 1, allows the diagnostic bit to control the ARB bus. Diagnostic software can then program a local arbiter to request the bus. Each local arbiter is tested independently. When a local arbiter competes, the bus is lost so that two functions may be tested: first, the ability of the local arbiter to lose control of the bus and, secondly, the central arbiter's timeout function. The timing chart (Fig. 2) illustrates the sequence of operation.

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