Browse Prior Art Database

Bar Code Reader With Voice Output

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039992D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Munroe, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described which enables visually impaired people to identify bar code labelled products, or sighted people to identify bar code labelled products with no display, or in certain hands-off operating conditions. UPC (Universal Product Code) bar code products are pervasive in the consumer world. Portable wands are available. If a wand reader was attached to a small processor and voice chip, a person could "read" bar codes and know the product name and size. This could then be used in the home to identify items, especially food. This would be great for the visually impaired. The portable device would ideally run on rechargeable batteries, have a small speaker and headphone jack, and a connector where information could be fed into the memory.

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Bar Code Reader With Voice Output

A method is described which enables visually impaired people to identify bar code labelled products, or sighted people to identify bar code labelled products with no display, or in certain hands-off operating conditions. UPC (Universal Product Code) bar code products are pervasive in the consumer world. Portable wands are available. If a wand reader was attached to a small processor and voice chip, a person could "read" bar codes and know the product name and size. This could then be used in the home to identify items, especially food. This would be great for the visually impaired. The portable device would ideally run on rechargeable batteries, have a small speaker and headphone jack, and a connector where information could be fed into the memory. The information could be new product information, price (when available), and the like. One source for downloading information would be a personal computer. The size of the unit could be the size of a "walkie-talkie" like that used by police or smaller. Another variation of this device would allow visually impaired or other individuals to receive voice output from bar codes in industrial environments. Voice output may be better in some low light conditions than liquid crystal displays and more practical than lighted displays from a power and size viewpoint.

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