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Efficient Operation of a Program on a Computer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000039996D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nyfeler, JA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is described for providing acceptable performance levels for a program running on a computer. The performance of a program is impacted severely when it is used on a computer to network computers. The performance drop is due to the task management on the computer. Previously, the way to get better performance from the program on a computer was to tailor the timeslice value that the task management program uses to allocate resources to a program until the program performed in an acceptable manner. The major drawback with this approach is that the resource does not vary in a dynamic way. Once the value is set, the system will not respond to changing system requirements. As other applications required resources, the program will not be able to share the resources assigned to it.

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Efficient Operation of a Program on a Computer

A method is described for providing acceptable performance levels for a program running on a computer. The performance of a program is impacted severely when it is used on a computer to network computers. The performance drop is due to the task management on the computer. Previously, the way to get better performance from the program on a computer was to tailor the timeslice value that the task management program uses to allocate resources to a program until the program performed in an acceptable manner. The major drawback with this approach is that the resource does not vary in a dynamic way. Once the value is set, the system will not respond to changing system requirements. As other applications required resources, the program will not be able to share the resources assigned to it. Many computers have a program called background print that never terminates, and continuously issues interrupt requests to the operating system for print work. The background print facility is the second lowest priority process in the system (only the system wait is lower). To provide timeslices to the program, an interrupt request to the program was added to the background print program that tells the program to execute. The net result of the above-mentioned approach is that the program receives the necessary system resources that it needs in proportion to the amount of system resource that the whole system has. In one test case, a 100%...