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Low Height DOCUMENT Scanner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040015D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davis, MI: AUTHOR

Abstract

A document scanner is described with a height of about 6 cm to allow it to be mounted within the base of a conventional visual display unit for transmitting data to an associated workstation. In order to avoid interference with the CRT a non-electrical document drive is provided by spring tension or pneumatic energy. (Image Omitted) The general arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 cross section, where the monitor base 1 contains a slide assembly 2 which can be withdrawn by the operator using handle 3.

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Low Height DOCUMENT Scanner

A document scanner is described with a height of about 6 cm to allow it to be mounted within the base of a conventional visual display unit for transmitting data to an associated workstation. In order to avoid interference with the CRT a non-electrical document drive is provided by spring tension or pneumatic energy.

(Image Omitted)

The general arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 cross section, where the monitor base 1 contains a slide assembly 2 which can be withdrawn by the operator using handle 3. After inserting the paper to be copied, the operator releases the handle 3, at which point, transport mechanism 11 returns the slide assembly to its fully retracted position, having passed the target paper by the optical system, consisting of miniature fluorescent tube 4 with reflector 5, angled plane mirror 6 bi-convex lens 7, collimator 8 and the detector 9, which is a charge- coupled device (CCD) that is capable of translating the focused line of dots across the page into a serial signal which is transmitted to the workstation. CCD 9 scans the width of the paper at a repetition rate determined by the number of lines per inch required and the speed of transport. Fig. 2 shows details of the slide assembly, including a glass cover 17 which keeps the paper flat and a button for use by the operator to signify that image acquisition should occur. Document 19 lies on matt black base
20. Fig. 3 shows how suitable movement of the slide assembly can be achieved and also shows how the transport sub-a...