Browse Prior Art Database

Technique for Computer Network Security Without Encryption

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040025D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rutledge, LS: AUTHOR

Abstract

A new method for secure transmission is disclosed, called the Reference Matrix (R Matrix). It provides a new technique for encoding a message over public switched networks using a spatial transformation. It is superior to encryption in that 1) no human intervention is allowed, 2) there is no key management involved (thus, no costs of key generation, maintenance, or distribution are incurred), and 3) it can be built on a chip for easy and inexpensive installation and use by front-end networking computers, to computerized branch exchanges. Its disadvantage is the use of more than one transmission circuit for a single message. Fig. 1 summarizes the use of the R Matrix compared to several other security mechanisms.

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Technique for Computer Network Security Without Encryption

A new method for secure transmission is disclosed, called the Reference Matrix (R Matrix). It provides a new technique for encoding a message over public switched networks using a spatial transformation. It is superior to encryption in that 1) no human intervention is allowed, 2) there is no key management involved (thus, no costs of key generation, maintenance, or distribution are incurred), and
3) it can be built on a chip for easy and inexpensive installation and use by front- end networking computers, to computerized branch exchanges. Its disadvantage is the use of more than one transmission circuit for a single message. Fig. 1 summarizes the use of the R Matrix compared to several other security mechanisms. To communicate multi-bit messages from one computer to another computer in a highly secure manner, a four-step process, as depicted in Fig. 1, is followed. First, the originating computer selects randomly a quantity, ra (which is less than n, the total number of ports available for telephone network access), and places the first call over a randomly selected port. The originating computer sends the sequence of ports and their order from the last transmission between these two computers as a verification block.

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Second, the destination computer receives the verification block, compares it to its saved verification block, and if proper, receives the rest of the calls (ra-1) from the o...