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Disk Logging of Intermittent Power Faults in an Unattended Communication Controller

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040029D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Combes, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a machine such as a communication controller, the power faults are of the following types: overcurrent, undervoltage, overvoltage, and air flow. They can occur in any power block and be reported to a central point in the power control subsystem. When power faults are detected, as the communication controller is exposed to malfunctions, the power control switches off the power in all the power blocks except in the power control itself, which allows an indication of the power fault to be externally presented to the communication controller. There are several ways of recovering from the power faults. This article describes a mechanism to keep track automatically of these power error recoveries.

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Disk Logging of Intermittent Power Faults in an Unattended Communication Controller

In a machine such as a communication controller, the power faults are of the following types: overcurrent, undervoltage, overvoltage, and air flow. They can occur in any power block and be reported to a central point in the power control subsystem. When power faults are detected, as the communication controller is exposed to malfunctions, the power control switches off the power in all the power blocks except in the power control itself, which allows an indication of the power fault to be externally presented to the communication controller. There are several ways of recovering from the power faults. This article describes a mechanism to keep track automatically of these power error recoveries. Two modes for recovering from power faults exist: -If the power control is set in local mode, which means that the communication controller is standalone from a power point of view, the fault condition is reset via an operator panel switch and there is a manual restart to power again the communication controller. -If the power control is set in remote, which means that the communication controller is a slave to a host for power-off or power-on and works unattended, the power control after a delay attempts to perform an automatic restart. The power faults can be either permanent or intermittent. -If permanent: When the power control restarts (manually or automatically), the fault is detected again and the power control switches off. The same power reporting is done on the operator panel. The confirmed reported fault indication allows appropriate maintenance procedures to be entered for power fault analysis and repair. -If intermittent: The power control does not recognize any fault and restarts. The operation may resume. In that case, no maintenance intervention is required, which is consistent with the fact that the communication controller is unattended most of the time. However, as permanent faults generally materialize first as intermittent faults, the power fault may reoccur later, the communication controller will stop again, will restart automatically, and this process will disturb the operation without the capability to identify the power problem, unless the fault becomes permanent. Thus, in such an environment, the problem is to keep track automatically of these power error recoveries. In case of a power fault, the whole power subsystem is switched off, (except for the panel and the power control), the power control circuit 1 presents the power error byte to the operator panel 2...