Browse Prior Art Database

Addressable Defect Monitor Design Utilizing Photo-Emitting Fault Location

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040083D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Holland, KL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A defect monitor design useful for early failure analysis and ground rule generation utilizes diffusions, a conducting line, a terminal and a microscope to visually detect fault locations. (Image Omitted) By utilizing a photo-emitting defect monitor with an addressable feature, fault locations and fault extent will become visible through a normal microscope. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and other sophisticated electronics are not required. To visually detect faults, a simple photo-emitting defect monitor design is utilized. It consists of a comb of long metal lines M1 and a plurality of photo-emitting cell structures (unit cell) placed parallel to the long lines. Fig.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Addressable Defect Monitor Design Utilizing Photo-Emitting Fault Location

A defect monitor design useful for early failure analysis and ground rule generation utilizes diffusions, a conducting line, a terminal and a microscope to visually detect fault locations.

(Image Omitted)

By utilizing a photo-emitting defect monitor with an addressable feature, fault locations and fault extent will become visible through a normal microscope. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and other sophisticated electronics are not required. To visually detect faults, a simple photo-emitting defect monitor design is utilized. It consists of a comb of long metal lines M1 and a plurality of photo-emitting cell structures (unit cell) placed parallel to the long lines. Fig. 1 shows a long metal line (M1), which is one line in a comb structure, connected to a pad which may be used for electrically biasing the lines M1. Parallel to each line M1 is a unit cell capable of photo-emission which is used as a visual indicator. The unit cell consists of an N- doped diffusion connected through a contact to a terminal. A plurality of unit cells (as shown in Fig. 2) are placed parallel to the lines M1 to form a matrix of monitors. In Fig. 2, Each unit cell has a different spacing from the adjacent line M1 of the comb when line spacing ground rules are being determined. Otherwise, normal line spacing for the product is utilized when placing unit cell terminals parallel to lines M1. Connected to the comb is a pad or "indicator" cell designed to simulate a short circuit when a known minimum voltage is applied to the pad. This cell structure is identical to the unit cell structure. When voltage is applied to the pad (indicator cell), one may optically observe the photo-emitting diffusion of any unit cell in the matrix if an adjacent long line M1 short circuits to the unit cell terminal, as shown in Fig...