Browse Prior Art Database

Wire Tensioner for Automated Assembly of Harness Cables

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040147D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barringer, WA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

For automated assembly of harness cables, such as shown in the article entitled "Self-Storing Build Board System For Automated Harness-Cable Assembly" in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin 28, 5607-5610 (May 1986), proper wire location and tension is required. This article describes a mechanism which insures both wire location and tension during wire-handling operations. The wire tensioner shown in the drawing is an autonomous device mounted on a build board, such as described in the cited article. It consists essentially of two rollers 1, 2 and a camming mechanism 3, as shown schematically. Roller 1 is stationary, and roller 2 is attached to a lever 4 loaded by a spring 5. The cam 3 is attached to the lever 4 to interact with the robot gripper fingers 6. The robot fingers hold the ends of the wire 7.

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Wire Tensioner for Automated Assembly of Harness Cables

For automated assembly of harness cables, such as shown in the article entitled "Self-Storing Build Board System For Automated Harness-Cable Assembly" in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin 28, 5607-5610 (May 1986), proper wire location and tension is required. This article describes a mechanism which insures both wire location and tension during wire-handling operations. The wire tensioner shown in the drawing is an autonomous device mounted on a build board, such as described in the cited article. It consists essentially of two rollers 1, 2 and a camming mechanism 3, as shown schematically. Roller 1 is stationary, and roller 2 is attached to a lever 4 loaded by a spring 5. The cam 3 is attached to the lever 4 to interact with the robot gripper fingers 6. The robot fingers hold the ends of the wire 7. The wire forms an arbitrary loop. The leading end of the wire 7 approaches the tensioner from the left. The robot fingers 6 contact the plate cam 3 of the tensioner. The spring-loaded lever swings as the gripper fingers 6 pass through the tensioner, thereby controlling the opening between the rollers 1 and 2. The cam profile is adjustable and designed so that the exposed terminals will not jam into the rollers. Screw 9 is used to adjust the cam position relative to the lever. The cam profile and the spring are designed to minimize loading of the robot fingers. As gripper 6 continues to move to the right, the...