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Power Conditioning Circuit for Automotive Vehicle Touch Controller

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040158D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bou-Ghannam, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a circuit design for a power conditioning circuit for an automotive vehicle touch controller. Automotive requirements on the vehicle wiring harness dictate that all interfaces to the vehicle harness must be capable of withstanding a short to battery voltage (+12 volts) or ground, and should survive the effect of specific electrical transients. The circuit, disclosed herein, meets these requirements, providing improved performance and in creased reliability over existing designs because of protection against electrical transients and shorts to battery voltage and ground. This disclosure describes in detail the design of the power conditioning circuit for a touch controller. Fig.

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Power Conditioning Circuit for Automotive Vehicle Touch Controller

This article describes a circuit design for a power conditioning circuit for an automotive vehicle touch controller. Automotive requirements on the vehicle wiring harness dictate that all interfaces to the vehicle harness must be capable of withstanding a short to battery voltage (+12 volts) or ground, and should survive the effect of specific electrical transients. The circuit, disclosed herein, meets these requirements, providing improved performance and in creased reliability over existing designs because of protection against electrical transients and shorts to battery voltage and ground. This disclosure describes in detail the design of the power conditioning circuit for a touch controller. Fig. 1 shows a conventional transient protection circuit consisting of a series pass diode 1 which provides reverse battery protection, a 6.8-volt zener diode 2 for clamping positive voltage transients, and two capacitors 3 and 4 for noise filtering. The input to this circuit is a regulated five volts from the advanced display controller (ADC) 5 over a harness (vehicle wiring) wire 6. Fig. 2 is a circuit diagram of the power conditioning circuit of this disclosure showing the five-volt regulator U1 used in the circuit. Regulator U1 uses battery voltage (V12C) passing through the touch controller [*] in order to derive five volts. U1 has a shutdown feature that enables the ADC to turn it off or on for proper vehicle power moding and for touch controller reset. U1 has the...