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Browse Prior Art Database

Ion Getter Trap for Water Vapor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040184D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bauer, HJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method has been developed for removing water vapor from thin film deposition chambers by bombarding it off the chamber walls and causing it to react with a getter electrode. The sputtering effect of an Ar plasma is used to simultaneously strip the surface of the electrode. (Image Omitted) In semiconductor processing the presence of water vapor in the deposition chamber 1 (Fig. 1) during sputter cleaning gives rise to high contact resistance at via interfaces of the wafer 3 upon deposition of interconnection metallurgy. To overcome this problem, a getter electrode 2 is installed inside the vacuum chamber at a distance of 15-20 mm from the chamber walls. The electrode is electrically insulated from the chamber walls and consists of a metal which chemically reacts with water vapor and O2 .

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Ion Getter Trap for Water Vapor

A method has been developed for removing water vapor from thin film deposition chambers by bombarding it off the chamber walls and causing it to react with a getter electrode. The sputtering effect of an Ar plasma is used to simultaneously strip the surface of the electrode.

(Image Omitted)

In semiconductor processing the presence of water vapor in the deposition chamber 1 (Fig. 1) during sputter cleaning gives rise to high contact resistance at via interfaces of the wafer 3 upon deposition of interconnection metallurgy. To overcome this problem, a getter electrode 2 is installed inside the vacuum chamber at a distance of 15-20 mm from the chamber walls. The electrode is electrically insulated from the chamber walls and consists of a metal which chemically reacts with water vapor and O2 . The metal may be either Al, Ti or Mg with aluminum best suited because of its ease of configuration and relative inexpensiveness. A ground shield 4 is installed concentric to the electrode to suppress the sputtering and the removal of the electrode material on the inner walls facing the ground shield. In operation, the vacuum chamber is first pumped down to 10-6 to 10-7 mbar. It is then backfilled with Ar gas to an equilibrium pressure of 10-2 to 10-4 mbar. A negative voltage (800-1000 volts) 5 is next applied to the electrode which causes ionization of the Ar gas and sputtering of the electrode's surface. Due to the ion bombardment of the electro...