Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Function End-Of-Arm Tooling for Printer Nozzle Assembly Inspection Station

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040215D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bleau, CD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a multi-function end-of-arm tooling which allows a printer nozzle to substrate assembly inspection operation to be performed at one workstation with one robot. Conventional methods of printer nozzle to substrate assembly inspection require two robots or a turret-type tool changer. The mechanism utilized in the present disclosure is shown in the drawing. The multi function end-of-arm tool attaches to the Z axis of a robot. The Z axis becomes the axis of rotation for the tool. For the primary function, upon command the tool is rotated to position. The air cylinder 4 is activated, causing moving jaw 1 to open. The robot arm guides the stationary jaw 2 and moving jaw 1 over the substrate to be processed.

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Multi-Function End-Of-Arm Tooling for Printer Nozzle Assembly Inspection Station

This article describes a multi-function end-of-arm tooling which allows a printer nozzle to substrate assembly inspection operation to be performed at one workstation with one robot. Conventional methods of printer nozzle to substrate assembly inspection require two robots or a turret-type tool changer. The mechanism utilized in the present disclosure is shown in the drawing. The multi function end-of-arm tool attaches to the Z axis of a robot. The Z axis becomes the axis of rotation for the tool. For the primary function, upon command the tool is rotated to position. The air cylinder 4 is activated, causing moving jaw 1 to open. The robot arm guides the stationary jaw 2 and moving jaw 1 over the substrate to be processed. The air cylinder then deactivates, causing the moving jaw to close and grip the substrate against the stationary jaw and move it into or out of the assembly inspection locations. In the secondary function, nozzle 9 is picked up by the tool by means of vacuum pickup 8. The nozzle is rotated into the correct orientation via the micro-stepper 7 (a stepping motor under micro-step control). The micro-stepper is controlled in pseudo-closed loop mode by home sensor 5 and home encoder 6 utilizing position-verification techniques. This multi-function tool allows very precise orientation and alignment of the nozzle to the substrate assembly as well as raw and populated subst...