Browse Prior Art Database

Stepper Motor Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040238D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bancroft, CE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby an IBM Personal Computer (PC), or similar microcomputers, can control up to 32 stepper motors from a single circuit card added to the computer. The concept is unique in that it enables one computer to control many automated applications which use stepper motors, while still allowing card slots in the computer to be available for other functions. This is accomplished by using the digital output (DO) portion of a digital input/digital output (DI/DO) circuit board to control the stepper motors. The implementation of the controls through the DO circuits provides the ability to generate three signals for each stepper motor - pulse, direction and mode. A square wave on the pulse signal line instructs the motor to advance one step.

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Stepper Motor Control

A technique is described whereby an IBM Personal Computer (PC), or similar microcomputers, can control up to 32 stepper motors from a single circuit card added to the computer. The concept is unique in that it enables one computer to control many automated applications which use stepper motors, while still allowing card slots in the computer to be available for other functions. This is accomplished by using the digital output (DO) portion of a digital input/digital output (DI/DO) circuit board to control the stepper motors. The implementation of the controls through the DO circuits provides the ability to generate three signals for each stepper motor - pulse, direction and mode. A square wave on the pulse signal line instructs the motor to advance one step. The voltage level on the direction signal line indicates whether the rotation of the stepper motor is to be clockwise or counterclockwise. The mode signal line controls the advance of the stepper motor, full or a half step, for each pulse generated. The three signals - direction, pulse and mode, are converted by a translator board into the phases necessary to operate a pair of motors. An example of the implementation is shown in the figure. Since commercially available DI/DO feature boards usually operate in groups of eight bits, from one to eight stepper motors may be operated using one instruction loop. This is accomplished by wiring all eight pulse signals to the same group of eight bi...