Browse Prior Art Database

Lead-Forming Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040354D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cadenhead, RL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A lead-forming tool is described for converting conventional dual-in-line packages (DIP), pin-in-hole (PIH) type, or any other leaded device, into a surface-mountable component. Surface-mount technology has become increasingly important in the industry. Many device types, however, are available only in PIH mounting configuration. In many instances a double process is required for populating cards with both PIH and surface-mountable devices. The expense of the double process can be eliminated using the disclosed technique requiring only one solder reflow process. The lead-forming tool shown in Figs. 1 and 2 shapes the leads of a DIP into the gull-wing or bulldog configurations shown, respectively, in Figs. 3 and 4. The tool is designed to perform both functions using different attachments. The top view of Fig.

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Lead-Forming Tool

A lead-forming tool is described for converting conventional dual-in-line packages (DIP), pin-in-hole (PIH) type, or any other leaded device, into a surface-mountable component. Surface-mount technology has become increasingly important in the industry. Many device types, however, are available only in PIH mounting configuration. In many instances a double process is required for populating cards with both PIH and surface-mountable devices. The expense of the double process can be eliminated using the disclosed technique requiring only one solder reflow process. The lead-forming tool shown in Figs. 1 and 2 shapes the leads of a DIP into the gull-wing or bulldog configurations shown, respectively, in Figs. 3 and 4. The tool is designed to perform both functions using different attachments. The top view of Fig. 1 shows a tool with members 1A and 1B in place, which serve to properly locate and align the device whose lead configuration is to be altered. A DIP is slipped upside down into cavity 9 of the tool beneath member 1A. Member 2 is placed in slot 10 and forced into the vertical DIP leads which bend inward, making the bulldog configuration. The opposite row of leads are treated after reversing the placement of the device in cavity 9. Leads are gull-winged using member 4A, shown in Figs. 5 and 6. A DIP is slipped upside down into cavity 9 as before. Member 4A is positioned in track 11 for grasping one row of leads in slot 12. Movement of member...