Browse Prior Art Database

Pluggable EMC Shield and Cable Strain Relief System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040390D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Byrum, RL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Shielded cables to a system are fitted at the point of entry to the system with a cable collar which provides electrical contact to the shield. The cable collar fits into a conductive flexible material cable-receiving rack having cable-insertion slots for cable support and cable shield grounding. In the past, external under-floor inter-frame cables of data processing systems required that cable shields be grounded at an interface panel usually with a ground jumper or drain wire screwed to the panel. An additional internal cable then was required to carry the distribution and control wiring to its point of termination. Strain relief of the external cables was typically provided via a metal clamp and screws.

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Pluggable EMC Shield and Cable Strain Relief System

Shielded cables to a system are fitted at the point of entry to the system with a cable collar which provides electrical contact to the shield. The cable collar fits into a conductive flexible material cable-receiving rack having cable-insertion slots for cable support and cable shield grounding. In the past, external under-floor inter-frame cables of data processing systems required that cable shields be grounded at an interface panel usually with a ground jumper or drain wire screwed to the panel. An additional internal cable then was required to carry the distribution and control wiring to its point of termination. Strain relief of the external cables was typically provided via a metal clamp and screws. The interface panels (enclosure) are then covered, requiring many screws, to provide physical separation of the cable entry area from the internal part of the machine.

(Image Omitted)

Fig. 1 shows a cable collar 10 on a conductive shield 12 of an insulated cable 14. Fig. 2 shows a cable-receiving rack made of a flexible conductive material, such as conductive rubber. Cable-receiving slots 18 are provided for receiving cable collars 10. Fig. 3 shows the back panel of an electrical device with electrical cables connected at junctions
20. The cables are fitted with cable collars 10 and fitted into cable-receiving rack 16 for EMC grounding at point of entry and for support and strain relief of the cable. Thus, jun...