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Printhead Design for Automated Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040419D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barenboim, M: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Printheads are frequently designed to be assembled in one continuous automated process which often includes one or more manual operations. The present embodiment is designed for a completely automated process in which a series of assembly tasks progressively raise the level of the unit. At each level the subassembly is a stable, self-contained unit which may be stored or locally buffered in the assembly process. Fig. 1 shows the first of four assembly tasks. It is seen that stator plate assembly 1, backstop assemblies 2 (only one of which is shown), and printed circuit (PC) board 3, are assembled to produce level #1 subassembly. Notches 4 and holes 5 in PC board 3, and hole 6 in the stator assembly are provided for orientation. (Image Omitted) Fig.

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Printhead Design for Automated Assembly

Printheads are frequently designed to be assembled in one continuous automated process which often includes one or more manual operations. The present embodiment is designed for a completely automated process in which a series of assembly tasks progressively raise the level of the unit. At each level the subassembly is a stable, self-contained unit which may be stored or locally buffered in the assembly process. Fig. 1 shows the first of four assembly tasks. It is seen that stator plate assembly 1, backstop assemblies 2 (only one of which is shown), and printed circuit (PC) board 3, are assembled to produce level #1 subassembly. Notches 4 and holes 5 in PC board 3, and hole 6 in the stator assembly are provided for orientation.

(Image Omitted)

Fig. 2 shows the second assembly task, in which coil assemblies 7 and associated residuals 8 (only one of each is shown) are added to level #1 subassembly to produce level #2 subassembly. Fig. 3 shows the third task, in which armature arm assemblies 9 (only one of which is shown), spring assembly 10, and spring plate 11 are attached to level #2 subassembly by three screws 12, to produce level #3 subassembly. Spring 10 is notched 13 for orientation. Fig. 4 shows the last assembly task, in which the wire guide (cone) 14 together with missiles 16 and springs 15 (only one of each is shown) are added to level #3 subassembly, retained by screw 17, to produce the level #4 subassembly (comple...