Browse Prior Art Database

Dual-Display Monitor Stand

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040424D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cory, TM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

An arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 which improves IBM Personal Computer (PC) products ergonomics and reduces workstation workspace requirements. The IBM PC products can have 2 displays (one monochrome and one color) connected to one system unit. This is a very nice feature for home, office, and program development. The user at home might want to do everyday typing on the monochrome display and play games on the color display. Office users might use both screens at the same time, using the monochrome display for entering commands and the color display for charts, plots, pictures, etc. Program developers can benefit by having 2 displays for similar reasons. They can use one screen for entering debug tool commands, and the other screen for the application under test.

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Dual-Display Monitor Stand

An arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 which improves IBM Personal Computer (PC) products ergonomics and reduces workstation workspace requirements. The IBM PC products can have 2 displays (one monochrome and one color) connected to one system unit. This is a very nice feature for home, office, and program development. The user at home might want to do everyday typing on the monochrome display and play games on the color display. Office users might use both screens at the same time, using the monochrome display for entering commands and the color display for charts, plots, pictures, etc. Program developers can benefit by having 2 displays for similar reasons. They can use one screen for entering debug tool commands, and the other screen for the application under test.

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About the only thing that is not so good about this arrangement is that only one display can sit on top of the system unit. Therefore, you either have to stack the displays one on top of the other (which is not very stable) or you have to take up workspace next to your system unit for the second display. The top of the system unit is almost wide enough to hold two displays. A dual-display stand is shown in Fig. 1 which holds both units nicely and does not take up any workspace. Also, it would be more stable than stacking the displays. Both displays are next to each other so both screens are easily viewable at the same time. Fig. 2 shows an alternate arrangement....