Browse Prior Art Database

Shoulder Drive Mechanism for EDR Robot

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040489D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, WA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a shoulder drive mechanism for an electric drive robot (EDR) utilizing a timing belt drive as the primary speed reduction and a worm gear set as the final drive to the shoulder actuating shaft. Conventionally, a helical (worm) gear set was used as the primary gear reduction in the shoulder drive of the robot arm. The output of the driven worm gear set was the input to a custom ground "spiroid gear (Image Omitted) and worm" assembly. In the shoulder drive mechanism disclosed herein, the conventional worm gear set has been modified to include a tapered locking bushing in the bore of the gear, as shown in Fig. 1, which is a section A-A across the front elevation of Fig. 2. This tapered bushing is tightened in place by a large hex lock nut.

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Shoulder Drive Mechanism for EDR Robot

This article describes a shoulder drive mechanism for an electric drive robot (EDR) utilizing a timing belt drive as the primary speed reduction and a worm gear set as the final drive to the shoulder actuating shaft. Conventionally, a helical (worm) gear set was used as the primary gear reduction in the shoulder drive of the robot arm. The output of the driven worm gear set was the input to a custom ground "spiroid gear

(Image Omitted)

and worm" assembly. In the shoulder drive mechanism disclosed herein, the conventional worm gear set has been modified to include a tapered locking bushing in the bore of the gear, as shown in Fig. 1, which is a section A-A across the front elevation of Fig. 2. This tapered bushing is tightened in place by a large hex lock nut. The tightening of the tapered bushing forces the bushing into engagement with the bore of the worm gear and the mounting shaft simultaneously. Prior to the inclusion of the tapered locking bushing, the gear was fastened to the drive shaft by a standard key and keyway. This arrangement did not furnish a completely movement-free assembly, which the tapered locking bushing accomplishes. Referring to Fig. 2, accurate adjustment of the worm gear set is accomplished by the addition of fixture keys to the worm support bearing housing. These keys maintain perfect alignment of the housing while adjusting the drive mechanism to a zero backlash condition. This is an important feat...