Browse Prior Art Database

Timing Disk for Optical Sensors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040519D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lutz, HF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Optical sensors are used as a control unit in conjunction with rotating timing disks. Such a control unit (Fig. 1) consists of a light transmitter 1 and a photoelectric light receiver 3 positioned opposite thereto. A timing disk 3, whose circumference is provided with periodically spaced segments 4, is arranged between the transmitter and receiver. Segments 4 either permit or do not permit light beam 5, emanating from transmitter 1, to impinge upon receiver 2. As timing disk 3 rotates about axis 6, electrical signals, acting as control signals, are periodically generated by receiver 2. The slightly enlarged sectional view of Fig. 2 shows the design of segments 4 (Fig. 1). Timing disk 3 consists of a transparent plastic material.

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Timing Disk for Optical Sensors

Optical sensors are used as a control unit in conjunction with rotating timing disks. Such a control unit (Fig. 1) consists of a light transmitter 1 and a photoelectric light receiver 3 positioned opposite thereto. A timing disk 3, whose circumference is provided with periodically spaced segments 4, is arranged between the transmitter and receiver. Segments 4 either permit or do not permit light beam 5, emanating from transmitter 1, to impinge upon receiver 2. As timing disk 3 rotates about axis 6, electrical signals, acting as control signals, are periodically generated by receiver 2. The slightly enlarged sectional view of Fig. 2 shows the design of segments 4 (Fig. 1). Timing disk 3 consists of a transparent plastic material. The segments along the circumference alternately consist of plane-parallel and prism-shaped regions 7 and 8. The plane-parallel regions 7 pass light beam 5 unimpeded to impinge upon receiver 2. If light beam 5 impinges upon a prism-shaped region 8, it is deflected such as not to impinge on receiver 2. Angle a of region 8 is suitably chosen to permit total reflection. The timing disk can be produced without burrs in a single step by injection molding.

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