Browse Prior Art Database

Self-Sufficient Cooling System for Electronic Components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040533D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pennell, GF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A described cooling system uses high junction temperature components in a processor to cool low junction temperature components of the same processor by using waste heat from one set of electronic components to cool another set of electronic components utilizing the concept of Dalton's law of partial pressures. As seen in the drawing, waste heat from electronic components operating at high junction temperature, such as processor power supplies, are used to drive a vapor generator 1, which is a heat exchanger. Inside the vapor generator 1 there is a binary mixture, e.g., NH3 and H2O. Because the NH3 has a lower boiling temperature, its vapor, containing H2O particles, will pass through a percolator tube 2.

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Self-Sufficient Cooling System for Electronic Components

A described cooling system uses high junction temperature components in a processor to cool low junction temperature components of the same processor by using waste heat from one set of electronic components to cool another set of electronic components utilizing the concept of Dalton's law of partial pressures. As seen in the drawing, waste heat from electronic components operating at high junction temperature, such as processor power supplies, are used to drive a vapor generator 1, which is a heat exchanger. Inside the vapor generator 1 there is a binary mixture, e.g., NH3 and H2O. Because the NH3 has a lower boiling temperature, its vapor, containing H2O particles, will pass through a percolator tube 2. Most of the liquid solution will settle at the bottom of a separator 3 and will flow through an absorber 4, back to the vapor generator 1. The hot NH3 vapor, being light, will rise through the riser tube 5 into the condenser 6 where it will condense into liquid by releasing the heat by natural convection via fins 7. The liquid NH3 will then flow into a low temperature evaporator 8 which cools the electronic components 9 which require very low junction temperatures. The evaporated NH3 vapor will then mix with another gas, e.g., H2, making up the partial pressure. The mixture of H2 gas and NH3 vapor flows back to the absorber 4 where the weak water solution absorbs NH3 vapor. Because of the chemical mixing o...