Browse Prior Art Database

Binder for Multilayer Ceramic Module Fabrication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040665D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hunt, DJ: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This article describes the use of polyethylenimine (PEI) as a binder for the formation of sintered ceramic substrates containing multilevel, interconnected thick film circuit patterns. PEI is soluble in water and allows good binder burn-out (low residual carbon level) in a nonoxidizing atmosphere, e.g., nitrogen, at a lower temperature than conventional polyvinylbutyral base binders. PEI, a nontoxic polymer, has excellent wetting characteristics for ceramic particles. Decomposition of PEI during burn-out is cleaner (less carbon residue) in an inert environment, e.g., nitrogen, than in an oxidizing environment. PEI molecular chains heated in an inert environment break every second monomeric unit, generating volatile piperazine.

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Binder for Multilayer Ceramic Module Fabrication

This article describes the use of polyethylenimine (PEI) as a binder for the formation of sintered ceramic substrates containing multilevel, interconnected thick film circuit patterns. PEI is soluble in water and allows good binder burn-out (low residual carbon level) in a nonoxidizing atmosphere, e.g., nitrogen, at a lower temperature than conventional polyvinylbutyral base binders. PEI, a nontoxic polymer, has excellent wetting characteristics for ceramic particles. Decomposition of PEI during burn-out is cleaner (less carbon residue) in an inert environment, e.g., nitrogen, than in an oxidizing environment. PEI molecular chains heated in an inert environment break every second monomeric unit, generating volatile piperazine. Thermogravimetric analysis of PEI in helium shows decomposition starts at about 200oC and completes at about 390oC. This low burn-off temperature in an inert atmosphere minimizes oxidation of conductors. Mechanical properties of ceramic green sheets, which are important variables for processing, can be easily controlled by either blending of different grades (different molecular weight) of PEI or complexing with reactive multivalent metal ions.

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