Browse Prior Art Database

Shock Mount

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040682D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Koshida, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a unique technique for attaching a shock mount to a base of a hard disk drive. As shown in Fig. 1, a base 10 of a hard disk drive is supported by columnar shock mounts 12 fixed to a frame 11. In general, a spring constant of the shock mount 12 must be small in order to provide a good vibration-proof function.

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Shock Mount

This article describes a unique technique for attaching a shock mount to a base of a hard disk drive. As shown in Fig. 1, a base 10 of a hard disk drive is supported by columnar shock mounts 12 fixed to a frame 11. In general, a spring constant of the shock mount 12 must be small in order to provide a good vibration-proof function.

On the other hand, the spring constant must be large in order to restrict the maximum deflection of the shock mount 12 when a shock is applied to the frame
11. To satisfy these contrary requirements, the shock mount 12 is attached to the base 10 at its recess portion 13, as shown in Fig. 2. A gap 14 exits between the peripheral surface of the shock mount 12 and a wall 13a of the recess portion 13. The size of the gap 14 is so determined that the shock mount 12 does not contact the wall 13a when vibrations are applied to the frame 11. In this situation, an effective length of the shock mount 12 remains equal to the length H of its body 12a made of rubber, and thus the spring constant of the shock mount 12 is relatively small to assure the good vibration-proof function. When a shock is applied to the frame 11, the shock mount 12 comes into contact with the wall 13a of the recess portion 13, as shown in Fig. 3, whereby the effective length of the shock mount 12 is changed to h which is shorter than H.

Since the spring constant of the shock mount 12 is inversely proportional to the effective length, it becomes relatively large,...