Browse Prior Art Database

Cable Connector Design for Robotic Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040695D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCarty, VD: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is disclosed to accommodate placement of a ribbon cable with a robot during the assembly of a computer. The drive cable is a length of ribbon cable which carries communication between the diskette drive and the main circuit board. The drive end of the cable has an edge connector and the board end has a forty-pin dual in-line package (DIP) connector. The problems presented in robotic placement of this assembly were: how to package the cable for presentation to the robot, how the robot could locate the cable and how the robot could find the other connector once one connector was plugged. Previous methods involved designing tooling to hold and locate the cable and to shuttle the cable into the product while the robot plugs first one end and then the other end of the cable into the circuit board.

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Cable Connector Design for Robotic Assembly

A method is disclosed to accommodate placement of a ribbon cable with a robot during the assembly of a computer. The drive cable is a length of ribbon cable which carries communication between the diskette drive and the main circuit board. The drive end of the cable has an edge connector and the board end has a forty-pin dual in-line package (DIP) connector. The problems presented in robotic placement of this assembly were: how to package the cable for presentation to the robot, how the robot could locate the cable and how the robot could find the other connector once one connector was plugged. Previous methods involved designing tooling to hold and locate the cable and to shuttle the cable into the product while the robot plugs first one end and then the other end of the cable into the circuit board. The solution, shown in Fig. 1, involved no tooling. The edge connector 10 is joined by a cable to DIP connector 30. Small tabs 50 are molded into the DIP connector 30 to matingly join with holes 40 in the edge connector 10. These tabs 50 are press fit into holes in the edge connector. The cable assemblies come to the robotic workstation with the connectors plugged together, as shown in Fig 2. Robot vision systems are used to find the cable assembly. Using vision allowed the use of inexpensive containers since the containers were not required to hold the cable assembly in any precise location. The cables came to the robot i...