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Testing a Regulated Power Supply

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040710D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergida, I: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

The method described in this article permits measuring the influence of component damage or aging in a power supply. When switched on, the power supply soon reaches a steady state in which the output voltage equals a regulated value Ur (Fig. 1). For testing the power supply, the normal loads are withdrawn, and at the time T1, the power supply is charged with a defined current I. The voltage drop resulting from this sudden charge is corrected by the power supply amplifier at a time interval T. The output voltage of the power supply starts with a first undershoot value U0 followed by a first overshoot value U1. After a certain number of oscillations n of the output voltage, the power supply returns to the regulated value Ur. As shown in Fig.

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Testing a Regulated Power Supply

The method described in this article permits measuring the influence of component damage or aging in a power supply. When switched on, the power supply soon reaches a steady state in which the output voltage equals a regulated value Ur (Fig. 1). For testing the power supply, the normal loads are withdrawn, and at the time T1, the power supply is charged with a defined current
I. The voltage drop resulting from this sudden charge is corrected by the power supply amplifier at a time interval T. The output voltage of the power supply starts with a first undershoot value U0 followed by a first overshoot value U1. After a certain number of oscillations n of the output voltage, the power supply returns to the regulated value Ur. As shown in Fig. 2, a charge control signal (CS) is applied to the gate of the field-effect transistor (FET) connected across the output of the power supply, with the latter being loaded by the current I. At the same time, signal CS is applied to measuring unit MU which measures the amplitudes and number of output voltage oscillations during the time T and compares these values with stored ones. These amplitudes of the voltage oscillations, the time T and the frequency f of the oscillations are the characteristic values of the power supply and constitute its signature. Increased amplitude values of U0 to Un and changes in the frequency f of these oscillations indicate a deterioration of the power supply's operat...